A Quick Guide to THC Laws in Other Countries

Marijuana use has become incredibly popular all over the world, though many countries still have strict laws prohibiting possession and usage. Many foreigners and tourists have encountered serious trouble when breaking marijuana laws in other countries, so it’s important to be cautious when you’re traveling. Even in several countries where marijuana use is common, the drug is still technically illegal, so you may still find yourself on the wrong side of the law. If you’re a fan of THC and plan to travel soon, keep reading for a quick guide to THC laws in other countries.

Where are the best countries to use THC?

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Marijuana legalization is spreading in the United States, with more than half of U.S. states permitting medical use. Even recreational use is becoming increasingly popular. However, many Americans don’t know the laws surrounding THC when traveling abroad. Before you try to smoke weed or use THC carts, you’ll definitely want to brush up on the legal situation in the country you’re visiting. Using a vape with THC cartridges is actually one of the most discreet ways to consume THC products, but you’ll still need to follow the local laws.

Europe is one of the most popular destinations, but no EU country has legalized cannabis entirely yet. Holland may be famously lax, but many don’t realize weed is technically still illegal there. The government has just decided not to enforce the laws so long as they abide by certain conditions. Anyone planning a stay in Porto hotels, for example, will likely have to skip on THC during their trip. Though medical use is legal in Portugal, recreational use is still not permitted. Marijuana is decriminalized in some European countries, so the penalties for personal use will be lighter in those areas.

Some of the best countries to smoke in might surprise you. Uruguay actually has THC products available for sale in pharmacies. America’s neighbor to the north, Canada, has also legalized recreational marijuana. There are a lot of other countries where weed is decriminalized or the laws are not enforced, but it can still be risky to use THC there as a tourist. Some countries where weed use is common but still technically illegal are Ecuador, Cambodia, Russia, Ukraine, Australia, and the Czech Republic.

Which countries have outlawed THC entirely?

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Though some countries with laws against THC still on the books have opted not to enforce them, that isn’t the case everywhere. There are still a number of countries that have harsh penalties imposed on the possession, sale, or manufacture of any products containing THC. In these parts of the world, you don’t want to get caught with even small amounts of weed. In the United Arab Emirates, even residual amounts of marijuana can land you in prison for four years.

Indonesia’s laws are famously restrictive, imposing a four to 12-year jail sentence on possession of marijuana. Large amounts can land you in prison for life. Japan’s zero-tolerance policy can also put you in jail for up to five years. Singapore’s Misuse of Drug Act doesn’t just require long jail sentences for marijuana possession: You can even be punished by caning in some cases. Saudi Arabia is one of the most dangerous countries since marijuana use is strictly prohibited but there are no standard punishments. This usually results in discipline being harsh, including lengthy jail sentences, deportation, and even public flogging.

Though THC use is becoming more common in most countries, there are still many laws restricting its use. Some parts of the world are growing increasingly tolerant, but others still have punishments as harsh as life imprisonment even for just possession of marijuana. If you plan on traveling, you should make sure you’re fully aware of all the laws surrounding the possession and usage of THC products in the country you’re visiting. Err on the side of caution, even in places where weed is decriminalized. It’s always better to be safe than sorry when you’re a tourist.